Category Acceptance

Acceptiocommunis

(noun) The shared and communal experience of acceptance within the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous; it reflects the bond and understanding that arise from embracing acceptance as a fundamental principle. From “acceptio” (Latin for acceptance) + “communis” (Latin for communal, shared).

Accipioevolutio

(noun) The transformative evolution of personal growth and recovery experienced through the acceptance of life’s challenges and adversities; it signifies the process of embracing hardships as opportunities for growth. Term root: “accipio” (Latin for acceptance) + “evolutio” (Latin for evolution,…

Reconscendo

(verb) To recognize and acknowledge the importance of self-acceptance in the process of recovery; it signifies the journey of discovering and embracing one’s true self without judgment or shame. From “re” (Latin for again, back) + “conscendo” (Latin for to…

Tolerantiaconsentio

(noun) The harmony and serenity attained through the combination of acceptance and tolerance in Alcoholics Anonymous; it reflects the understanding and allowance of diverse viewpoints and experiences within the fellowship. From “tolerantia” (Latin for tolerance) + “consentio” (Latin for acceptance,…

Acceptiogratia

(noun) The transformative grace and blessings that arise from the practice of acceptance in recovery and within the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous; it signifies the acknowledgment and gratitude for the positive changes brought about by embracing acceptance. From “acceptio” (Latin…

Acceptioserenitas

(noun) The serene and peaceful state achieved through complete acceptance of oneself, others, and life’s circumstances in recovery; it reflects the harmony and tranquility found in embracing the present moment without resistance. Term root: “acceptio” (Latin for acceptance) + “serenitas”…

Accepthereditas

(noun) The acceptance and acknowledgment of one’s genetic predisposition or family history of alcoholism; the recognition of hereditary factors in addiction as a means of understanding and addressing personal vulnerabilities in recovery; from Latin “accipere” (to accept) and “hereditas” (inheritance).